National Register FAQ

Will submitting my application early increase my chances of receiving funding?

All applications submitted by the deadlines are considered for funding equally. As long as a qualifying application is received on time, it does not change the likelihood of whether or not it’s funded.

Categories: For History, Historic Canals, Hungry for History, Legends & Lore, National Register, NYS Historic Markers

Will the Pomeroy Foundation pay for my damaged marker?

The Foundation does not pay for the replacement of markers that have been damaged (caused by cars, snowplows, vandals, etc.) or stolen. While markers are intended to be placed in areas where they can be viewed by the public, it is the grantee’s responsibility to carefully consider location. We strongly suggest that markers be installed far enough back from the roadway to mitigate the likelihood of being hit by a vehicle, including plows and trucks with large payloads. If damage or theft occurs, please consult your insurance provider.

Categories: For History, Historic Canals, Hungry for History, Legends & Lore, National Register, NYS Historic Markers, Women's Suffrage

Can I apply for a marker commemorating my home or commercial business?

Our grants are open to all municipalities, charitable 501(c)(3) organizations and nonprofit academic institutions in the United States. The applying agency must fall into one of these categories. Often, municipal historians or local historical organizations (or related nonprofits) will apply for a marker on behalf of the property owner.

Please note that we do not award National Register marker grants for private residences or commercial properties.

Categories: Historic Canals, Hungry for History, Legends & Lore, National Register, Women's Suffrage

How do I maintain and care for my new marker?

Your marker is manufactured to last for many, many years. But did you know that regular maintenance can help extend your marker’s “like new” look for decades to come? Here are a few helpful tips to get you started.

Carefully planned placement of your marker

  • Markers last much longer when they are placed in a location that minimizes the impact of the elements. Take into consideration the proximity of your planned location to roads, passing snowplows, trees, utility poles, water, etc.

Marker pole preparation

  • We recommend using a piece of poly plastic between the connecting surfaces of the pole and marker. This is a simple yet effective way of keeping the surfaces from corroding together and making removal of the marker from the pole much easier if ever needed. An oversized piece of plastic can be cut, then draped over the top of the pole, and temporarily taped in place while the marker is set on the pole. Once the screws of the mount have been tightened, carefully trim off the excess plastic at the base of the marker, making sure not to cut into the coating on the pole.

Annual cleaning

  • Cleaning your marker once a year with a mild mix of soap and water will extend the life of your marker. In doing so, you are removing a layer of road salt, dust, pollen, tree sap and other contaminants that will eventually degrade your marker’s coating. You may have to clean your marker more frequently if it is exposed to extreme conditions. Non-metal brushes or cloth are recommended for cleaning.
Categories: Historic Canals, Hungry for History, Legends & Lore, National Register, NYS Historic Markers, Women's Suffrage

What is the National Register of Historic Places and how does a property get listed?

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate and protect historic and archeological resources in the United States.

National Register Designations

Contact your State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) or check their web page for information about the National Register, research materials and necessary forms to begin the nomination process. If the property is on federal or tribal land, then the process starts with the Federal Preservation Office or Tribal Preservation Office.

 

Categories: National Register

Do we pay for the marker or incur any other expenses?

No. The Pomeroy Foundation provides grants that pay for the entire cost of the marker, pole and shipping. Our grants do not require matching funds.

Once the marker grant application is approved, you will receive an email with a Letter of Agreement to be signed electronically by an authorized representative of your organization. When this is completed, the Foundation will mail a check for the total cost to your organization, as well as information that explains how to order the marker from our foundry.

The grantee is only responsible for the installation. Local public works, highway department or civic organizations often volunteer to help with this step.

Categories: Historic Canals, Hungry for History, Legends & Lore, National Register, NYS Historic Markers, Women's Suffrage

Does the Foundation limit the number of markers it funds each grant round?

Our historic marker grants are non-competitive, which means we do not limit the total number of marker grants awarded during each grant round. Applicants cannot apply for more than five (5) markers per grant round. If you have an idea for a project involving more than five markers, please contact us to discuss further.

 

Categories: Historic Canals, Hungry for History, Legends & Lore, National Register, NYS Historic Markers

Can I apply for more than one marker grant at the same time?

Yes! You may apply for multiple markers in each grant round or in subsequent grant rounds. You may also apply for grants from different programs, including Legends & Lore®, National Register of Historic Places and Historic Transportation Canals. 

Categories: Historic Canals, Hungry for History, Legends & Lore, National Register, NYS Historic Markers, Women's Suffrage